Conflict beach taking shape in Canary Islands


The construction work on the controversial beach of Mogán in Gran Canary started 2 December.
Published: 04.12 - 2019 10:28Printer version    
On 2 December 2019, the maintenance work on the Mogán beach began. Mogán is a town and municipality in the southern tip of the Gran Canary Island, Spain.

Controversially, the municipality had ordered tonnes of sand from occupied Western Sahara to renovate the tourist spot. The purchase contributes to finance the illegal Moroccan occupation of the former Spanish colony.

Western Sahara Resource Watch documented the arrival of the first trucks with sand, transported to Mogán from the Arinaga harbour. The sand masses had been transported on board the vessel Dura Bulk. WSRW wrote about the upcoming plans on 1 December.

All videos and photos below are made by WSRW and are free of use. No credit needed.


WSRW has got access to six protest letters that the civil society in Canary Islands sent to different public institutions on the island on 28 November 2019: Letter to Alcaldia, letter to Ayuntamiento de Mogan, letter to Delegación del gobierno, letter to Patronato de Turismo, letter to Consejería de Política Territorial, letter to Secretaria del ayuntamiento.


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Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
EU Court cases on Western Sahara for dummies

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It's not easy keeping up with all the different legal proceedings relating to Western Sahara. For the sake of clarity, here's an overview of the five different cases at the Court of Justice of the European Union.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

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Leading activists from Western Sahara are condemned to sentences ranging from 20 years to life imprisonment in connection to a mass protest in 2010 denouncing the Saharawi people’s social and economic marginalization in their occupied land; the Gdeim Izik protest camp.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

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Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
Report: Moroccan green energy used for plunder

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At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.

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