Moroccan King's windfarm in occupied land now carbon credited approved
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One year ago, a wind farm project that Morocco is undertaking in occupied Western Sahara was turned down when seeking to obtain UN-sponsored carbon credits. Now, that same project has been approved by another, private credit issuing agency.
Published: 23.09 - 2013 16:18Printer version    
In May 2013, the Foum el Oued Wind Farm Project became registered at the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) - a voluntary greenhouse gas reduction programme. Having received a positive appraisal by SGS United Kingdom Limited, a British firm assigned to evaluate the project's compliance with VCS's standards, the Foum el Oued project can now obtain carbon credits, which can be traded in for hard cash.

There are two markets for carbon credits; the compliance or regulatory carbon market and the voluntary carbon market.

"While the former was set up by the international community to achieve governments’ and companies’ compliance with the Kyoto Protocol through a strict set of rules and standards, the latter lacks precisely that: government oversight and a clear, common set of procedures for selecting emission reduction projects. The voluntary market has nevertheless expanded tremendously over the past few years, and has become a lucrative business where anyone, including individuals, can purchase carbon credits to mitigate their own greenhouse gas emissions", says Eva Filzmoser from Carbon Market Watch, a Brussels based NGO advocating a fair and effective climate protection.

It is in this market that VCS is a big player, using its own set of standards to determine whether a project is eligible for carbon credits.

The Foum el Oued Project is to be operated and managed by NAREVA Holding, a Moroccan industrial and financial group controlled by the King of Morocco. German multinational Siemens AG has been contracted to supply the wind turbines and technical know-how to the project. According to the Moroccan agency for Electricity, the project should be up and running by 2014.

NAREVA’s attempt to register the Foum el Oued project in the UN dominated compliance market was unsuccessful. Det Norske Veritas, the Norwegian firm certified by the UN Clean Development Mechanism  to evaluate the project, turned the project down in 2012 precisely because it was located in a politically controversial area. With no prospect of obtaining carbon credits, the entire project became less profitable for the Moroccan operator. This may have motivated NAREVA's subsidiary Energie Eolienne du Maroc (EEM) to try the voluntary carbon market, where the lack of standardized rules seems to have played in its advantage.

WSRW has today sent a letter to the Board of VCS, requesting them to reconsider the registration of the Foum el Oued wind farm project.

    
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Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

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On 17 February 2013, in a mockery of justice, a Moroccan military court condemned 25 Saharawi citizens to shockingly tough prison sentences. Help us to release the Gdeim Izik 25.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

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Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
Report: Moroccan green energy used for plunder

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At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.
The Western Sahara oil curse

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Big oil’s interest in occupied Western Sahara has taken a dramatic turn for the worse. Some companies are now drilling, in complete disregard of international law and the Saharawi people’s rights. Here’s what you need to know.

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