Unemployed Saharawis were beaten for demanding a job
ansari_12.12.2015a_610.jpg

Several Saharawis were allegedly injured in a demonstration in El Aaiun yesterday, in which youth demanded employment opportunities on their own land. Among them a 34 year old law graduate.
Published: 13.12 - 2015 22:23Printer version    
ansari_12.12.2015_340.jpg“Two officers took my banner from me, on which I had written that the wealth of natural resources in Western Sahara should guarantee me a job”, stated Abd Ali Ansari, a 34 year old unemployed Saharawi.

“Then they pushed me and hit me in really sensitive parts of my body. I fell to the ground and I was trampled on. I believe my nose is broken”, stated Ansari, who holds a master degree in private law.

Western Sahara Resource Watch was in contact with Ansari today via a friend of his.

Last month the director of OCP, Mustapha Terrab, on the occasion of the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Moroccan occupation of Western Sahara, promised 500 jobs at the Phosbucraa phosphate factory, for startup from January 2016.

The follow-up of that promise was the trigger that sparked yesterday's demonstration.

“When OCP later announced the qualification criteria, it appeared that the job opportunities would go to non-Saharawis. You see, Saharawis are not allowed to take certain careers at the Moroccan universities. In order to apply, one needed qualifications that are unavailable to us”, stated one of the participants of yesterday’s events to WSRW.  

After 40 years of occupation, there are no universities in Western Sahara proper.

Around two dozen demonstrators are said to have been injured in the events in El Aaiun yesterday afternoon. WSRW has not received independent confirmation about the veracity of the numbers of injured, but has been in contact with one of the injured.

The demonstration took place at 5pm yesterday evening, on the Matala Street. The demonstration was organised by a group calling itself "the Sahrawi coordination of unemployed graduates and other deprived people". The majority of those demonstrating is said to have been graduates with university degrees. One of the demonstrators told WSRW that they all remained peaceful and did not block the traffic.

One eye-witness says that the demonstrators were being attacked and abused by uniformed and plain clothed security service personnel. The Moroccan Auxiliary Forces are said to have followed some of the injured to the hospital, where they were harassed.

Morocco’s state owned phosphate mine is the biggest employer in the occupied territory. Morocco took over the management of the mine only few weeks after the occupation, in the last months of 1975. The last years, WSRW has made annual reports on whereto this phosphate rock is exported. Four importers have halted the imports over the controversies.

demo_12.12.2015a_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015b_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015c_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015e_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015f_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015g_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015h_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015i_400.jpg

demo_12.12.2015j_040.jpg

    

Top
News:

29.04 - 2017 / 24.03 - 2017Domino of Spanish regions urge for no Western Sahara trade
27.04 - 2017 / 27.04 - 2017Cargo of salt from occupied Western Sahara arrived in the Netherlands
26.04 - 2017 / 26.04 - 2017Unemployed Saharawis set up protest camp in occupied Western Sahara
26.04 - 2017 / 25.04 - 2017San Leon blames security for pause in occupied Western Sahara
25.04 - 2017 / 24.04 - 2017New report on global phosphate trade from occupied Western Sahara
23.04 - 2017 / 19.04 - 2017Vigeo Eiris asserts Saharawi consent unnecessary
15.04 - 2017 / 15.04 - 2017Kosmos/Cairn oil study in occupied waters has ended
11.04 - 2017 / 31.03 - 2017Agrium looks to other sources than Western Sahara
11.04 - 2017 / 11.04 - 2017Self-immolation by Moroccan sea captain in Dakhla
31.03 - 2017 / 31.03 - 2017Polisario protests Kosmos/Cairn exploration in occupied waters
30.03 - 2017 / 30.03 - 2017FMC Corp confirms it is no longer into Western Sahara phosphates
28.03 - 2017 / 28.03 - 2017Here is Kosmos Energy's supply vessel in occupied Western Sahara
28.03 - 2017 / 28.03 - 2017Unemployed Saharawi youth hi-jacked OCP bus
24.03 - 2017 / 24.03 - 2017Morocco's P for Politics in Africa
23.03 - 2017 / 07.03 - 2017Kosmos with extensive seismic studies off occupied Western Sahara
23.03 - 2017 / 23.03 - 2017African Union asks Morocco not to sign Western Sahara deals
20.03 - 2017 / 20.03 - 2017French government dilutes Court of Justice conclusion
17.03 - 2017 / 17.03 - 2017Spain confirms: EU-Morocco trade deal not for Western Sahara goods
17.03 - 2017 / 02.03 - 2017New controversial energy infrastructure to be built in Western Sahara
16.03 - 2017 / 16.03 - 2017New publication on the EU and Western Sahara




EN ES FR DE AR

Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
Report: COP22 controversy - Moroccan green energy used for plunder

tn_poweringplunder_eng_610.jpg

At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

tn_sjovik_demo_610.jpg

Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
The Western Sahara oil curse

tn_san_leon_protest_camps_8_august_2015_610x200.jpg

Big oil’s interest in occupied Western Sahara has taken a dramatic turn for the worse. Some companies are now drilling, in complete disregard of international law and the Saharawi people’s rights. Here’s what you need to know.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

tn_court_photo_gdeim_izik_610.jpg

On 17 February 2013, in a mockery of justice, a Moroccan military court condemned 25 Saharawi citizens to shockingly tough prison sentences. Help us to release the Gdeim Izik 25.

WSRW.org News Archive 2016
WSRW.org News Archive 2015
WSRW.org News Archive 2014
WSRW.org News Archive 2013
WSRW.org News Archive 2012
WSRW.org News Archive 2011
WSRW.org News Archive 2010
WSRW.org News Archive 2009
WSRW.org News Archive 2008
WSRW.org News Archive 2007
WSRW.org News Archive 2004-2006


Register for our English newsletter:









These web pages have been built with the financial support of the trade union Industry Energy