The Weekly Times: Incitec defends import policies
Fertiliser giant Incitec Pivot has been forced to defend its continued sourcing of phosphate rock from a disputed North African territory.
Published: 31.12 - 2007 11:25Printer version    
The Weekly Times, December 26 2007.
By ROSLYN LANIGAN

Chairman John Watson told shareholders at its annual general meeting last week the company was not in breach of international law by importing from Western Sahara.

A small group of protestors gathered outside the meeting to urge Incitec Pivot to halt trading with Morocco, which controls Western Sahara.

Inside, shareholders heard that despite another tough year for agricultural Australia, Incitec Pivot's earnings jumped 148 per cent in the year to September 30. Shares in the company have tripled in a year and traded at more than $110 on Friday.

But activists have slammed Incitec Pivot, saying it breaches international law by importing from Western Sahara. Australia Western Sahara Association Victorian secretary Cate Lewis said Morocco was selling the phosphate illegally.

Western Sahara has been fighting for the right to self determination, backed by the United Nations, since Spanish colonisers pulled out in 1976. Ms Lewis said Australian fertiliser companies could make a “big difference” by shunning imports of Western Saharan phosphate.

"If Incitec Pivot joined with the other Australian importers (Wesfarmers CSBP and Impact) and the two New Zealand importers, that group would be the biggest importer of this phosphate in the world,'' she said.

"Phosphate exports are half of the Moroccan economy.'' Ms Lewis said the UN had condemned Morocco for selling resources from the territory and the Federal Government had urged companies to seek legal advice before importing material from Western Sahara.

But Mr Watson said Incitec Pivot fulfilled all international law obligations.

"We look to the UN and the Australian Government to guide us on these matters,'' he said.

He said there would be "significant consequences" for Australian farmers if fertiliser companies halted trade with Morocco.

"Without rock from Western Sahara, it is unlikely that Australian manufacturers could produce the one million tonnes of single superphosphate farmers require each year,'' he said.

Incitec Pivot chief executive Julian Segal said fertiliser prices would remain high next year due to strong demand and a tight international market.

"I can't see in the short and medium term any change in this demand and, on the supply side, there isn't a huge pipeline of new projects coming up,'' Mr Segal said.

"You are not going to see the price of fertiliser going back to what it was a few years ago. I think this is a new sustainable level of prices.''

    

Top
News:

03.05 - 2018 / 03.05 - 2018Camel researchers move event from Western Sahara to Morocco
25.04 - 2018 / 24.04 - 2018New report on contentious Western Sahara phosphate trade
17.04 - 2018 / 20.03 - 2018Auction for seized Western Sahara phosphates to close
16.04 - 2018 / 16.04 - 2018Polisario will take EU Council to Court over fish deal
16.04 - 2018 / 16.04 - 2018EU will broker new fish deal with Morocco, including Western Sahara
12.04 - 2018 / 12.04 - 2018Camel conference in occupied Western Sahara dishonest about funders
10.04 - 2018 / 10.04 - 2018UN study on Morocco's green energy plans fails at geography
27.03 - 2018 / 26.02 - 2018EU risks recognising Western Sahara products as Moroccan
21.03 - 2018 / 21.03 - 2018EU Commission dead set on fishing in Western Sahara
20.03 - 2018 / 20.03 - 2018Does OPEC consider Western Sahara to be part of Morocco?
20.03 - 2018 / 27.08 - 2010Support Western Sahara Resource Watch
06.03 - 2018 / 06.03 - 2018Kosmos Energy maintains propaganda site after Western Sahara exit
02.03 - 2018 / 01.03 - 2018What is HeidelbergCement doing in occupied Western Sahara?
01.03 - 2018 / 01.03 - 2018Confirmed: Innophos key client of Western Sahara phosphate rock
28.02 - 2018 / 28.02 - 2018South Africa stands up against the plunder of Western Sahara
28.02 - 2018 / 28.02 - 2018Bermuda shipping company drops Western Sahara
27.02 - 2018 / 27.02 - 2018EU and Morocco announce continued fisheries partnership
27.02 - 2018 / 23.02 - 2018EU Parliament slams Commission on Western Sahara talks
27.02 - 2018 / 27.02 - 2018Polisario: open to negotiate Western Sahara deals with the EU
27.02 - 2018 / 27.02 - 2018Saharawi refugees celebrate EU Court victory




EN ES FR DE AR

Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
EU Court cases on Western Sahara for dummies

tn_law_hammer.jpg

It's not easy keeping up with all the different legal proceedings relating to Western Sahara. For the sake of clarity, here's an overview of the three different cases at the Court of Justice of the European Union.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

tn_court_photo_gdeim_izik_610.jpg

Leading activists from Western Sahara are condemned to sentences ranging from 20 years to life imprisonment in connection to a mass protest in 2010 denouncing the Saharawi people’s social and economic marginalization in their occupied land; the Gdeim Izik protest camp.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

tn_sjovik_demo_610.jpg

Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
Report: Moroccan green energy used for plunder

tn_poweringplunder_eng_610.jpg

At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.

WSRW.org News Archive 2018
WSRW.org News Archive 2017
WSRW.org News Archive 2016
WSRW.org News Archive 2015
WSRW.org News Archive 2014
WSRW.org News Archive 2013
WSRW.org News Archive 2012
WSRW.org News Archive 2011
WSRW.org News Archive 2010
WSRW.org News Archive 2009
WSRW.org News Archive 2008
WSRW.org News Archive 2007
WSRW.org News Archive 2004-2006


Register for our English newsletter:









These web pages have been built with the financial support of the trade union Industry Energy