Correspondence with Petrokemija, Tata Chemicals and Tripoliven
Emails sent from WSRW to the 2 phosphate importing firms Petrokemija and Tata Chemicals on 24 November 2010, and Tripoliven 25 November 2010.
Published: 24.11 - 2010 15:53Printer version    
[Email sent to chairman Jagušt, with copies to the Board members Nedjeljko Klopček, Tomislav Seletković and Zdenka Krstanović]

Dear Chairman of Petrokemija, Mr. Josip Jagušt

The Norwegian Support Committee for Western Sahara and Western Sahara Resource Watch have for several years researched the international firms taking part in purchasing phosphates from the Bou Craa mines in Western Sahara.

As you probably know, such imports are in violation of international law, as it takes place in the disregard of the wishes of the people of the occupied territory.

We have noticed that Petrokemija on a number of occasions in the past has imported phosphate rock from Western Sahara.

In our research we have come across a large number vessels arriving your port in Kroatia with such cargo.

We would appreciate if you have the possibility to reply to the following questions.

1) Does Petrokemija today have an agreement with OCP for purchases of phosphate rock from the Bou Craa mine in Western Sahara? If yes, when does it expire and when was it signed?
2) How many tonnes of phosphate rock from Western Sahara did Petrokemija import during the years 2008, 2009 and 2010?
3) When did Petrokemija receive the last shipment of phosphate rock from Western Sahara?


Looking forward to hear from you,

Sincerely yours,

Sigrun Espe
Vice chair,
Norwegian Support Committee for Western Sahara
[...]

Sara Eyckmans
Coordinator,
Western Sahara Resource Watch
[...]


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Email sent to corporate_communications@tatachemicals.com]
Dear Sirs,

The Norwegian Support Committee for Western Sahara and Western Sahara Resource Watch have for several years researched the international firms taking part in purchasing phosphates from the Bou Craa mines in Western Sahara.

As you probably know, such imports are in violation of international law, as it takes place in the disregard of the wishes of the people of the occupied territory.

We have noticed that Tata Chemicals on at least 3 occasions in the past has imported phosphate rock from the territory.

More specifically, the vessels we have observed is the “Sea Emperor” in 2004, and the vessels “Sin Hai” and “Amber Wave” in 2006.

We would appreciate if you have the possibility to reply to the following questions.

1) Can you confirm that these 3 vessels contained phosphate rock cargo destined for your firm, and that the cargo had origin in Western Sahara?
2) Does your firm today have an agreement with OCP for purchases of phosphate rock from the Bou Craa mine in Western Sahara? If yes, when does it expire?
3) When did your firm receive the last shipment of phosphate rock from Western Sahara?

Looking forward to hear from you,

Sincerely yours,

Sigrun Espe
Vice chair,
Norwegian Support Committee for Western Sahara
[...]

Sara Eyckmans
Coordinator,
Western Sahara Resource Watch
[...]



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Estimados señores,

El Comité Noruego de Apoyo al Sahara Occidental y Western Sahara Resource Watch han investigado durante varios años a las empresas internacionales, que participan en la adquisición de fosfatos de la minas  de Bu Craa en el Sáhara Occidental.

Como usted probablemente sabe, dichas importaciones están violando el Derecho Internacional, ya que se llevan acabo ignorando  los deseos de la población autóctona del territorio. En junio de 2008, El presidente del Comité Noruego de Apoyo al Sahara Occidental mandó el Correo que viene Abajo a su Empresa.

Desde que le enviamos nuestro correo en Junio de 2008, no hemos podido confirmar ninguna importación a Tripoliven.

Le agradeceríamos  mucho, si usted tiene la posibilidad de responder a las siguientes preguntas:

1)     ¿Tripoliven actualmente tiene un contrato o acuerdo con OCP, para comprar roca fosfórica de la mina de Bu Craa en el Sahara Occidental? En caso afirmativo, ¿cuándo caduca y, cuándo se firmó?
2)       Si  Tripoliven ha cesado  las importaciones desde el Sahara Occidental,  ¿Qué  razones fueron imperativas para  concluir el comercio en el Sahara Occidental?
3)      ¿Cuándo Tripoliven recibió el último envío de roca de fosfato desde Sahara Occidental?

Estamos a la espera de su respuesta.

Atentamente.

Sigrun Espe
Vice presidente,
Norwegian Support Committee for Western Sahara
[....]
www.vest-sahara.no

Sara Eyckmans
Coordinadora,
Western Sahara Resource Watch
[....]
www.wsrw.org


[....]

Tripoliven

Estimados señores,

Creemos que ya conocen las controversias relacionadas con la importacion de fosfatos del Sahara Ocidental, ocupado por Marruecos.
En los dos enlaces abajo, pueden ver copias de dos cartas, mandadas a empresas navieras que han transportado aquel fosfato.

1)
Carta mandado por Western Sahara Resource Watch, el sindicato Industry Energy y el Comité Noruego de Apoyo al Sahara Occidental a R-Bulk de Noruega el 30 de mayo 20 2008
http://www.wsrw.org/files/pdf/letter_r-bulk_30.05.08.pdf  

2)
Carta mandado por Japan Sahara Association a Sanko Lines el 3 de junio de 2008.
http://www.wsrw.org/files/pdf/letter_sanko_03.06.08_english.pdf

Como quizas saben, R-Bulk ha dicho a la prensa noruega que lamentan por haber participado en este comercio, prometiendo que nunca van a hacerlo nuevamente.
http://wsrw.org/index.php?parse_news=single&cat=105&art=730

Saludos cordiales,
Ronny Hansen
Comité Noruego de Apoyo al Sahara Occidental.

    


EN ES FR DE AR

Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
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