Saharawi fishermen in Dakhla protest against discrimination
dak5_610_200.jpg

This morning, Saharawi fishermen gathered in front of the Delegation of Fisheries in Dakhla, to protest against discriminating employment practices and destructive marine management.
Published: 11.01 - 2013 20:02Printer version    
A press release by the fishermen associations Nawras, Qindil and the Association of Sailors working onboard Fishing Vessels, says that more than 50 fishermen had teamed up for the protest.

Grievances over what they claim are discriminatory practices of a company responsible for assigning fishermen onto vessels brought them to protest in front of the Delegation of Fisheries, an institution of the Moroccan government that has occupied parts of Western Sahara since 1975. The fishermen blame the recruitment bureau for excluding the Saharawis, the native inhabitants of the area, while giving preferential treatment to fishermen from Morocco proper.

The protesters furthermore aired their disapproval of destructive fishing practices by the Russian fleet. Russian trawlers have returned to Western Saharan waters late December, almost immediately after the conclusion of a new Russian-Moroccan fisheries agreement.

The Saharawi fishermen say that the Russians have little respect for the marine wildlife in the region. They contend that the Russian vessels still use internationally banned fishing methods such as driftnets. Endangered species and marine mammals, such as dolphins and whales, are frequently caught and die in these nets. According to the fishermen, the Russians get away with it as official observers who should be monitoring vessels’ compliance with rules and regulations set forth in the agreement, are largely absent.

Though the agreement grants 10 Russian trawlers access to the Moroccan waters, WSRW has thus far observed 8 of the vessels fishing in the waters of occupied Western Sahara. The previous agreement stipulated that the Russians had access to the Moroccan Exclusive Economic Zone, which does not include Western Saharan waters. Yet then, like now, the Russian fleet was predominantly active in occupied waters.


dak4_610.jpg

dak11_610.jpg

dak7_610.jpg

dak3_610.jpg

    


EN ES FR DE AR

Morocco occupies the major part of its neighbouring country, Western Sahara. Entering into business deals with Moroccan companies or authorities in the occupied territories gives an impression of political legitimacy to the occupation. It also gives job opportunities to Moroccan settlers and income to the Moroccan government. Western Sahara Resource Watch demands foreign companies leave Western Sahara until a solution to the conflict is found.
Stand up for the Gdeim Izik 25!

tn_court_photo_gdeim_izik_610.jpg

Leading activists from Western Sahara are condemned to sentences ranging from 20 years to life imprisonment in connection to a mass protest in 2010 denouncing the Saharawi people’s social and economic marginalization in their occupied land; the Gdeim Izik protest camp.
Support Western Sahara Resource Watch

tn_sjovik_demo_610.jpg

Help us to protect the natural resources of Western Sahara for the Saharawi people. Support our work by making a donation.
Report: Moroccan green energy used for plunder

tn_poweringplunder_eng_610.jpg

At COP22, beware of what you read about Morocco’s renewable energy efforts. An increasing part of the projects take place in the occupied territory of Western Sahara and is used for mineral plunder, new WSRW report documents.
The Western Sahara oil curse

tn_san_leon_protest_camps_8_august_2015_610x200.jpg

Big oil’s interest in occupied Western Sahara has taken a dramatic turn for the worse. Some companies are now drilling, in complete disregard of international law and the Saharawi people’s rights. Here’s what you need to know.

WSRW.org News Archive 2017
WSRW.org News Archive 2016
WSRW.org News Archive 2015
WSRW.org News Archive 2014
WSRW.org News Archive 2013
WSRW.org News Archive 2012
WSRW.org News Archive 2011
WSRW.org News Archive 2010
WSRW.org News Archive 2009
WSRW.org News Archive 2008
WSRW.org News Archive 2007
WSRW.org News Archive 2004-2006


Register for our English newsletter:









These web pages have been built with the financial support of the trade union Industry Energy